Original Research

Coping and adaptation mechanisms employed by sub-Saharan African migrant women in South Africa

Alice Ncube, Yonas Bahta, Andries Jordaan
Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies | Vol 11, No 1 | a645 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v11i1.645 | © 2019 Alice Ncube, Yonas T. Bahta, Andries Jordaan | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 March 2018 | Published: 13 June 2019

About the author(s)

Alice Ncube, Disaster Risk Management Training and Education Centre for Africa, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Yonas Bahta, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Andries Jordaan, Disaster Management Training and Education Centre for Africa, University of the Free State, South Africa


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Abstract

This article assesses the socio-economic coping and adaptation mechanisms employed by sub-Saharan African migrant women in South Africa using a survey and multi-attribute contingent ratings. The socio-economic and adaptation mechanisms were identified using a sustainable livelihood framework, which included political and cultural capital. This study focused on the rarely investigated South-South migration flows. The results found that the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of migrant women played a significant role in the coping and adaptation mechanisms they employed. Human capital ranked the highest, followed by physical, cultural, social, economic and political capitals. This implies that the livelihood capital has an implication: the migrant women need to have education and health services to survive in day-to-day activities of their life as human capital. They need also to sustain economically at least to cover house rent, food, communicate with family and assist the family as economic and physical capitals. Furthermore, they need to adapt, respect and live with the culture of the host nation in harmony and conducive environment as social, cultural and political capitals.

Keywords

coping and adaptation mechanism; livelihood capitals; migrant women; South–South migration; sub-Saharan Africa; attribute contingent ratings

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Crossref Citations

1. Job Market Perceptions of African Migrant Women in South Africa as an Initial and Long-Term Coping and Adaptation Mechanism
A. Ncube, Yonas T. Bahta, A. J. Jordaan
Journal of International Migration and Integration  year: 2019  
doi: 10.1007/s12134-019-00704-w