Original Research

Greenhouse gas emissions as sustainability indicators in agricultural sectors’ adaptation to climate change: Policy implications

Tom E. Volenzo, John O. Odiyo, John Obiri
Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies | Vol 11, No 1 | a576 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v11i1.576 | © 2019 John Obiri, John O. Odiyo, Tom E. Volenzo | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 21 November 2017 | Published: 19 June 2019

About the author(s)

Tom E. Volenzo, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, South Africa
John O. Odiyo, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Venda, Thohoyandou, South Africa
John Obiri, School of Disaster Management and Sustainable Development, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kakamega, Kenya


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Effective adaptation action to climate change requires a balance between reducing vulnerabilities and managing risks. However, in most adaptation actions, risks such as greenhouse gas emissions, and those that impose negative externalities on global communities and ecosystems, are often overlooked. This article contextualises adaptation of maize stover (MS) as a dairy cattle feed among resource-poor farmers in western Kenya. In so doing, it attempts to establish the nexus between resource constraint and maladaptation to climate change. Simulation of methane emissions was carried out from secondary data and a survey of dairy cattle feeding strategies by resource-poor farmers. The level of greenhouse gas emissions in dairy feeding strategies is used as a measure and indicator of sustainability. Using disaster risk reduction principles, policymakers and community of practice in climate change action are encouraged to design and implement policies and strategies that take cognisance of poverty–maladaptation–environmental degradation nexus.

Keywords

climate change adaptation; disaster risk reduction; externalities; greenhouse gases; sustainability

Metrics

Total abstract views: 219
Total article views: 180


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.