Original Research

The complexity of maladaptation strategies to disasters: The case of Muzarabani, Zimbabwe

Siduduziwe Ncube-Phiri, Chipo Mundavanhu, Blessing Mucherera
Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies | Vol 6, No 1 | a145 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v6i1.145 | © 2014 Siduduziwe Ncube-Phiri, Chipo Mundavanhu, Blessing Mucherera | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 02 July 2014 | Published: 28 November 2014

About the author(s)

Siduduziwe Ncube-Phiri, Department of Geography, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe
Chipo Mundavanhu, Department of Geography, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe
Blessing Mucherera, Department of Geography, Bindura University of Science Education, Zimbabwe


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Abstract

Over the past decade disasters have increased both in complexity and multiplicity, worseningthe plight of vulnerable communities the world over. Many communities have devised copingmechanisms to mitigate the impact, but communities such as Muzarabani in Zimbabweremain susceptible to disasters. This article seeks to analyse whether the coping measuresapplied make the communities safe from or vulnerable to disasters. Information was obtainedthrough interviews, questionnaires and observations from four villages in Chadereka in theMuzarabani district. The results of this study indicated that households, government andnon-governmental organisations have come up with different mitigation strategies, suchas growing crops along river beds, livestock production, raised granaries and doorsteps,flood evacuation shelters and other emergency services. Research revealed that althoughviable, some of the strategies increased the community’s vulnerability. This article thereforerecommends sustainable utilisation of resources, and collaborative efforts to address the rootcauses, dynamic pressures and unsafe conditions in order to reduce the vulnerability of poorcommunities to natural disasters.

Keywords

disaster; vulnerability; disaster risk reduction; mitigation strategies, sustainability

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