Original Research

Interfacing vector-borne disease dynamics with climate change: Implications for the attainment of SDGs in Masvingo city, Zimbabwe

Lazarus Chapungu, Godwell Nhamo
Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies | Vol 13, No 1 | a1175 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v13i1.1175 | © 2021 Lazarus Chapungu, Godwell Nhamo | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 01 June 2021 | Published: 28 September 2021

About the author(s)

Lazarus Chapungu, College of Economics and Management Sciences, Institute of Corporate Citizenship, Exxaro Chair of Climate and Sustainability Transitions, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Godwell Nhamo, College of Economics and Management Sciences, Institute of Corporate Citizenship, Exxaro Chair of Climate and Sustainability Transitions, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

This study used a mixed-methods research design to examine the sensitivity of vector-borne disease (VBD) patterns to the changes in rainfall and temperature trends. The research focused on malaria in Masvingo Province, Zimbabwe. The study interfaced the climate action, health and sustainable cities and communities with sustainable development goals (SDGs). Historical climate and epidemiological data were used to compute the correlations and determine the possible modifications of disease patterns. Clustered random and chain-referral sampling approaches were used to select study sites and respondents. Primary data were gathered through a questionnaire survey (n = 191), interviews and focus group discussions, with Mann–Kendal trend tests performed using XLSTAT 2020. The results show a positive correlation between malaria prevalence rates and temperature-related variables. A decline in precipitation-related variables, specifically mean monthly precipitation (MMP), was associated with an increase in malaria prevalence. These observations were confirmed by the views of the respondents, which show that climate change has a bearing on malaria spatial and temporal dynamics in Masvingo Province. The study concludes that climate change plays a contributory role in VBD dynamics, thereby impeding the attainment of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, especially SDG 3, which deals with health. The study recommends further research into appropriate adaptation mechanisms to increase the resilience of rural and urban communities against the negative transmutations associated with weather and climatic pressures.

Keywords

climate change; adaptation; vector-borne diseases (VBDs); malaria; SDGs; communities; Masvingo; Zimbabwe

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