Original Research

Disaster resilient village-based approach to disaster risk reduction policy in Indonesia: A regulatory analysis

Saru Arifin, Sonny S. Wicaksono, Slamet Sumarto, Martitah Martitah, Dewi Sulistianingsih
Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies | Vol 13, No 1 | a1021 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jamba.v13i1.1021 | © 2021 Saru Arifin, Sonny S. Wicaksono, Slamet Sumarto, Martitah Martitah, Dewi Sulistianingsih | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 July 2020 | Published: 23 June 2021

About the author(s)

Saru Arifin, Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia
Sonny S. Wicaksono, Department of Criminal Law, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia
Slamet Sumarto, Department of Civic Education, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia
Martitah Martitah, Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia
Dewi Sulistianingsih, Department of Private and Commercial Law, Universitas Negeri Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia


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Abstract

This article will address the disaster resilience village (DRV) approach as a disaster preparedness method in Indonesia. This scheme became operational in 2012, exactly 5 years after disaster management legislation was passed in 2007. This DRV strategy is a component of the central government’s decentralisation of disaster management to local governments. Using a method of doctrinal legal review, this study argues that the DRV approach to disaster preparedness at the village level is inefficient. That is because the village apparatus is the central player in this DRV, but residents of disaster-prone areas are regarded as an afterthought when it comes to disaster management. Consequently, efforts to strengthen emergency preparedness for residents in disaster-prone areas will be harmed. As a result, it is unsurprising that whenever a disaster occurs in Indonesia, the death toll and damage to property remain high. This is because people who live in disaster-prone areas lack a framework for transforming knowledge and scientific experience with disasters. In addition, this DRV strategy opposes previous disaster experts’ community-based and transformative approaches. However, direct field research on communities living in disaster-prone areas is needed to obtain empirical evidence of the DRV approach’s shortcomings.

Keywords

resilience; community; village; disaster risk reduction; preparedness.

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